FemslashEx reveals!

Oct. 22nd, 2017 04:37 am
shopfront: (KJ - [team] remain orderly)
[personal profile] shopfront
Between sickness and impending houseguest I barely scratched the surface of the archive before author reveals, so if you're in the same boat you should totally come slowly catch up read with me post-reveals instead. There is some awesome things in there. I wrote:

Going Easy (1355 words) by shopfront
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Wolf 359 (Radio)
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: Graphic Depictions Of Violence
Relationships: Isabel Lovelace/Renée Minkowski
Characters: Doug Eiffel, Alexander Hilbert, Hera (Wolf 359)
Additional Tags: Sparring, Flirting, Tension, Missing Scene
Summary: Minkowski and Lovelace aren't enemies, exactly. But they're not friends either, and it seems prudent that they find a way to work together better - even if it involves a little bloodshed.

I actually ended up diving into a new fandom post-matching this year, which is unusual for me, and I had a lot of fun catching up on Wolf 359. (Mostly but still not quite caught up on the very, very latest eps, so no spoilers please!) I highly recommend it if anyone has considered trying it. I am not a podcast person, or an audiobook person either. I tend to struggle to focus when listening instead of reading words. But this was engaging enough that I had way, way fewer problems than usual, so for what that's worth - 'tis excellent fun!

I am also off to see Cursed Child today, finally. Happy belated birthday to meeee. Both parts back to back on four hours sleep with flu while dragging along a jetlagged houseguest. So that should be interesting. But I'm so excited!
havocthecat: shego facepalms at stupid people, and everything else (kim possible shego facepalm)
[personal profile] havocthecat
Thousands of Bats Slaughtered Annually in Asia End up on Ebay and Etsy for Artsy Americans

Oh, of course they're not "ethically sourced," because why would they be when profit is involved?

(You see skeletal art at local craft shows too.)

(I really wasn't creeped out by dead thing art before.)

(Not that I don't understand "killing lots of shit for profit," but also PASSENGER PIGEONS, enough said there.)

(Damn it.)
havocthecat: amy pond of doctor who with a magnifying glass (dw amy pond investigates)
[personal profile] havocthecat
I usually ignore the salt measurements except when baking, and just salt to taste, but that's because I've been cooking since I've been old enough to drag a chair to the stove and push vegetables around on a skillet. This is potentially disastrous to people who don't know as much about cooking!

Sometimes your recipes call for a specific type of salt - and there could be an actual reason why. Not if it's trendy salt, usually, but if it's "sea salt," Diamond kosher salt, or Morton's kosher salt, there's a specific reason and you should actually pay attention. Who knew?

I mean, I've been cooking for multiple decades and I had no fucking clue before this morning, so if you didn't know, don't feel bad! Hell, Bon Appetit magazine didn't even know until 2013, and they're goddamn Bon Appetit gourmet magazine.

This is going to make a world of difference in my pickling, that's for sure. No wonder my pickled turnips always turn out too salty.

The Kosher Salt Question

Tagline: Prized for its purity and flaky texture, kosher salt has been a home-cooking standard for decades. But the two major brands, Diamond Crystal and Morton, are very different products. Your ruined meatballs can attest.

Gospel

Oct. 16th, 2017 05:35 pm
lunabee34: (reading by sallymn)
[personal profile] lunabee34
Gospel Gospel by Wilton Barnhardt

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Let me begin with the obligatory statement (seriously, check the other reviews) that Dan Brown wakes at night and cries into his pillow because nothing he's written has come even close to being as good as Gospel.

The novel takes place in the 80s and concerns an aging, male academic and a young, floundering, female grad student on the search for The Gospel of Matthias; the modern day search is interspersed with chapters of the gospel they're trying to find and translate. I read this for the first time as a grad student (somewhere between 2001-2003), and it blew me away. I was studying to convert to Catholicsm at the time, and I'd been reading a lot of Elaine Pagels (gnostic gospels) and hagiographies of saints and the history of Christianity and medieval mystics, and this book was just fascinating. It's heavily footnoted (and while the narrative is fictional as well as the gospel itself, the footnoted information is factual according to the author as is all the currents events stuff happening in the novel and much of the theological conversation the characters have). This was the first time I heard of the cult of Mithra or of Catherine of Siena wearing Jesus's foreskin as a magical wedding ring (naturally, it was invisible to everyone but Catherine).

On re-read, my love for this book is only slightly diminished. The Gospel of Matthias is both hilarious (unintentionally so because Matthias does not get what's happening around him half the time; he's constantly misinterpreting events) and ultimately moving because it's the quest of a man who'd been a minor disciple, only in the presence of Jesus a few time and mostly chosen because he's rich and can bankroll the ministry, to recover his lost faith.

Most of the book is the characters having theological arguments, telling theological dirty jokes, and cataloging all the bizarre anecdata of the Catholic Church. Those parts are still fun.

I like that the book turns the usual narrative about an aging male academic and his female grad student groupie on its head. Dr. O'Hanrahan is full of man pain; he's a womanizer and a drinker, and he lost his wife and kid in tragic accidents, and he's angry and disappointed that he never wrote that bestseller or made a huge mark on the academy despite all his promise--and the whole point of the book is that all his existential angst and nearly all of his problems are of his own making and he's reaping the consequences of his choices. Also, he and Lucy never have a romantic relationship (although the book seems to be going there a couple times, and I started to get nervous on this re-read because I couldn't remember that trajectory).

God gets a voice in this book; he speaks in parentheticals which are amusing and beautiful and full of mercy for his creation. I really like that authorial choice.

Having grown up in the community, I appreciate the depiction of Evangelical Christianity in all its tacky glory at the end of the novel. Considering the times we currently live in, that depiction seems eerily prescient.

I have some issues with the way that Lucy is presented: concerned about her weight and her virginity and etc. I also have some issues with the way race is handled at times. On the whole, I think this book does a good job of presenting multiple points of view about religion, however.

Definitely recommend this book, but it's a time investment at over 700 pages (with lots of eensy footnotes).



View all my reviews
shopfront: (Trek - [Michael] sometimes down is up)
[personal profile] shopfront
Cut for spoilers, but for those trying to find or avoid positive/negative responses I'm leaning back towards yay Trek again today. )

Some mildly spoilery thoughts for Desperate Hours (the tie-in novel) in relation to 1.05 )

On a completely trivial note, my computer and mobile devices all keep trying to autocorrect Georgiou to gorgeous (which, yes, but also stoppit) and can anyone recommend a good icon maker(s) doing Star Trek Discovery? I really, really need some pretties, but nothing is crossing my feed.
lunabee34: (sga: lorne closeup by scifijunkie)
[personal profile] lunabee34
I'm about to have an evening to myself. Josh is taking Emma to Atlanta to watch Markiplier (I have no idea what a live show by a guy who does Let's Plays on Youtube would even look like, but fortunately, I don't have to go!), and I will have this whole evening to devote to conversation.

Ask me a question. Tell me something. *bats eyelashes*

I'll get back to you around 7:30 tonight.

Also, does anybody know how to get your own posts to show up in your friends list on DW? My LJ was set up that way, and I really liked it because I often used my latest post as the marker to start with when I began reading my flist. Any help would be appreciated.

Tooting No Award's horn

Oct. 15th, 2017 09:02 am
lizbee: (Default)
[personal profile] lizbee
The proper grown-up blog I share with [personal profile] yiduiqie has been linked from some amazing places in the last month, and I just want to document it for posterity and ego boosting:
  • The New Yorker linked to our 2015 post about the sinister subtext of Thomas the Tank Engine. Yes, that New Yorker. Ain't no thang. *hairflip*
  • (That article was then shared at BoingBoing, where the comments were filled with nerds taking our silly post very seriously indeed.)
  • BookRiot's crime fiction podcast discussed our post on why we're not supporting the Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries film Kickstarter, and our earlier post (linked in our recent one) about the racism in the books and TV series, and how it's something that non-Australians seem to overlook.
  • The podcast included a wonderful bit where the hosts were like, "Well, these Australian ladies say the books are problematic, but we wanted to make up our own mind, so we read one each." But they chose the books at random, and had the misfortune to end up with Blood and Circuses, The One With The Infamous Clown Sex. (If you watched the series -- which I really love, when it's not being incredibly racist -- you should take a moment to appreciate the lack of clown sex. Really.) Anyway, they concluded that, yes, the books are very bad in terms of exotifying and othering people of non-Anglo backgrounds, but they're also just not well-written and ... bad. Which is fair. 
  • And The Monthly, an Australian publication whose essays and articles appeal to flat white-sipping inner-city lefties (so, me), linked to our first Discovery post in an article about angry, racist nerds complaining that Trek is "suddenly" appealing to an "SJW" agenda.
  • (I am extremely proud to get the word "feelpinions" into The Monthly, BUT I also wonder if my use isn't a bit defensive, ie, no one can accuse me of being emotional, irrational or otherwise a silly lady fan if I say it first. Am I putting myself at a disadvantage by emphasising that my posts are reactions, not reviews, and that my opinions derive from my emotions? On the other hand, what is television for but to elicit an emotional reaction?)
Finally, here is this week's Discovery post, which I almost didn't share because it wasn't wholly positive and ... IDK, I guess I've become protective of this ridiculous show, and don't want to play into the narrative of it being The Worst. On the other hand, it made some Bad Choices this week, along with some better ones. (And I note that the dude reviewers who have decried it as being The Worst really liked this episode, which only reassures me that I'm on the right track.)

coffeeandink: (Default)
[personal profile] coffeeandink
These are very gossipy shallow reactions, but maybe I will get back into the swing of posting, who knows.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend S03E01 )

Jane the Virgin S04E01 )

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